Hillary’s Bold Lies

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There she goes again.

The other day, Hillary Clinton appeared at her alma mater — Wellesley College — and gave a talk that was, without the slightest sense of irony (but of course), a serious case of projecting her own record, problems, and pattern onto the bane of her current existence — President Trump.

Where to begin? Let’s start here, with this story from Real Clear Politics which includes a good bit of the actual transcript of her talk. The headline?

Hillary Clinton: “Classic Pattern” Of Fascist Takeover Is Happening Right Now In The United States

So, point by point, let’s work our way through what she projected of her own pattern — er, I mean — what she had to say:

“The demagoguery, the appeal to the crowd, the very clever use of symbols, the intimidation, verbal and physical,” she said. “This is a classic pattern. There is nothing new about it, it is just different means of messages being delivered.”

“The demagoguery, the appeal to the crowd?” Here is Hillary in Philadelphia in 2016 making her “appeal to the crowd.” She plays the race card, deliberately miscasting Trump’s remarks on illegal immigration and race. Which is to say, she was doing exactly what she — falsely — accused Trump of doing: using “demagoguery, the appeal to the crowd.”

“The very clever use of symbols”? Note the sign on the podium with her symbolic slogan — “Stronger Together.” In discussing Italian Fascism, Wikipedia notes this (bold print for emphasis supplied): “National and social unity was symbolized by the fasces themselves, the bound sticks being stronger together than individually.[48]” The footnote is to the book Mussolini’s Italy: Life Under the Fascist Dictatorship, by the British author R.J.B. Bosworth. Bosworth is seen by fellow historians as the leading scholar on modern Italy. In his book Bosworth says this: “Fascism was much given to enthusing about unity; [it] pledged the dictatorship to bind Italians together inseparably.” Which is to say, Hillary’s own doubtless subconscious selection of her slogan was, yes, borrowed from Mussolini and his Italian fascists. She makes much of former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s recent book Fascism: A Warning. Without the slightest sense of irony, Hillary herself embraces the fascist slogan — yet accuses Trump.

And Trump’s slogan? That would be “Make America Great Again.” A slogan that originated with Ronald Reagan — and was appropriated in 1992 by… yes indeed… candidate Bill Clinton. Apparently Hillary sees Trump, Reagan, and her own husband as using a fascist slogan.

Next up she complains of “the intimidation, verbal and physical” of the President. Two words in answer: Juanita Broaddrick. Enough said.

Hillary says, “There is nothing normal about undermining the rule of law.” This from the woman who played fast and loose with the much legally sought after Rose Law firm records that finally, at last, no one knows how, mysteriously showed up suddenly in the residential quarters of the Clinton White House. Not to mention she was a central player in the presidency of the man who was headlined this way in the Los Angeles Times in 1999:

Clinton Fined $90,686 for Lying in Paula Jones Case

That story began (bold print for emphasis supplied):

The federal judge who found President Clinton in contempt of courtlast April levied a penalty of $90,686 against him Thursday, making him the first chief executive ever assessed such a payment.

Repeating her condemnation of Clinton for lying under oath in the Paula Corbin Jones sexual harassment lawsuit, U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright said that she was imposing the sanction to cover some of Jones’ legal expenses and “to deter others who might consider emulating the president’s misconduct.”

Hillary says “There is nothing normal about undermining the rule of law.” Unless, of course, either she or her husband are involved.

Hillary said in her Wellseley appearance:

I have the rather unusual experience of having worked on the 1974 impeachment inquiry staff, because when I was in law school I was part of something called the Barrister’s Union, which was the trial practice group at Yale, and five of us were asked to join the impeachment inquiry staff, which I agreed to, and it was an incredible professional experience and a very sobering public experience. And so my first job on that staff was to research and help write a memo about what is an impeachable offense — literally, you can not make my life up.

She left something fairly substantial out of that description. Her then-boss in that episode was lifelong Democrat Jerry Zeifman, who said he did not approve of her conduct on the Committee staff. Why? “Because she was a liar. She was an unethical, dishonest lawyer. She conspired to violate the Constitution, the rules of the House, the rules of the committee and the rules of confidentiality.”

And finally there was this gem from Hillary. Referring to President Trump, she loftily proclaims: “There is nothing normal about attacking the press.” Memo to Hillary? It was the Clinton-run Department of Justice through Deputy Attorney General Eric Holder that launched an investigation into The American Spectator simply because the Spectator was doing its journalistic duty in investigating the Clinton administration.

Now. Taken together? What do we have here? What we have is Hillary Clinton once again looking the American people through the camera’s eye and just simply — no other word for it — lying. Hoping everyone has lost their memory of her words and deeds in her career.

Words and deeds that she now tries to ascribe to Donald Trump as a “classic pattern” of fascism.

A more vivid example of what psychologists call “projection” could not be had. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines projection this way:

• the attribution of one’s own ideas, feelings, or attitudes to other people or to objects

 • especially: the externalization of blame, guilt, or responsibility as a defense against anxiety

Memo to Hillary? To see someone who has a “classic pattern” of fascism — look no further than the nearest mirror.

Source: The American Spectator

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