Susan B. Anthony was a women’s suffrage leader who rose to prominence after being arrested for voting in her hometown of Rochester, N.Y., in 1872.

Anthony, who was already active in the anti-slavery movement, became a leader in women’s rights in 1854. In 1869, she co-founded the National Woman Suffrage Association.

Within a few years, she was convicted and fined for violating the laws permitting only men to vote. Anthony’s widely publicized trial, however, effectively brought national attention to the suffrage movement.

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Although she was fined for her crime, she refused to pay and authorities declined to take further action.

Anthony was best known for being the “most visible” leader in the suffrage movement to secure voting rights for women.

This is an undated sketch drawing of suffragette Susan B. Anthony. Anthony. (AP Photo)

Today, she is recognized as a champion of temperance, abolition, the rights of labor and equal pay for equal work, according to the Women’s National History Museum.

Anthony, born in Adams, Mass., in the early 1800s, was raised as a Quaker alongside her seven brothers and sisters, who also became activists for justice as well as the emancipation of slaves.

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Growing up, Anthony was inspired by the Quaker belief that everyone was created equal under God. It was a belief that carried her through her life’s work, according to the Women’s National History Museum.

Anthony died in 1906, roughly 14 years before women were given the right to vote.

However, her efforts paid off. In 1920, the 19th Amendment, or the measure that ensured women the right to vote, was passed.

On Aug. 18, 2020, President Trump announced that he will give a posthumous pardon to Anthony, marking 100 years after the 1920 ratification of the 19th Amendment.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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Source: FoxNews

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